Carebara

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Carebara
Carebara distincta
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Class: Insecta
Order: Hymenoptera
Family: Formicidae
Subfamily: Myrmicinae
Tribe: Crematogastrini
Genus: Carebara
Westwood, 1840
Type species
Carebara lignata
Diversity
225 species
8 fossil species
(Species Checklist)

Carebara distincta casent0010802 profile 1.jpg

Carebara distincta

Carebara distincta casent0010802 dorsal 1.jpg

Specimen Label

Synonyms

Hita Garcia, Wiesel and Fischer (2013) - The taxonomy of the genus has seen great improvements on both generic and regional levels during the last decade (Fernández, 2004, 2006, 2010). The Afrotropical species have yet to be revised and available keys for this species in this region are outdated and fragmentary. The entire genus, with more than 200 species (Bolton, 2012), would benefit highly from an updated revision. Most Carebara are small, cryptic, hypogaeic ants that nest in the soil, the leaf litter or in termite mounds. The latter is important since some species seem to be lestobiotic (Bolton & Belshaw, 1993). Some species (e.g. Carebara castanea) show an extreme size dimorphism between the tiny worker and the very large queen caste.

Photo Gallery

  • Excavating a Carebara nest. Photo by Christian Peeters.
  • Carebara queen with workers. Notice the huge size difference (dimorphism) between workers and their queen. Photo by Christian Peeters.
  • Carebara queen, Western Ghats, India. Photo by Manoj Vembayam.

Identification

Fischer et al. (2015) - Due to a lack of comprehensive revisions and identification keys for Old World Carebara, identifications are challenging. On a regional level, however, taxonomic treatments exist for the Arabian Peninsula (Sharaf and Aldawood 2013), Taiwan (Terayama, Lin and Eguchi 2012), India (Bharti and Kumar 2013), and Fischer et al. (2014) revised the newly defined and mostly Afrotropical Carebara polita group. Weber’s (1950) revision for the Afrotropical Oligomyrmex species is outdated and, as it does not contain a key, is also of very limited use for identifications of the treated species. For the New World, Fernández (2004) published a valuable revision of Carebara with a provisional key, where he synonymized the former genera Oligomyrmex (Mayr), Paedalgus (Forel), and Afroxyidris (Belshaw & Bolton) with Carebara and defined species complexes based on worker morphology. As several previous studies showed (e.g. Ettershank 1966, Fernández 2004, Fischer et al. 2014, and Azorsa and Fisher in revision) all of the synonymized genera were morphologically poorly delimited from Carebara and thus treated as polyphyletic units. Bharti and Kumar (2013) also pointed out the necessity to restructure Fernández’ New World species group definitions in order to incorporate the much more species-rich but poorly studied Old World fauna.

Keys including this Genus

Keys to Species in this Genus

Species Groups

Distribution

World distribution based on political regions. View/Edit Data
Carebara Distribution.png Worlddistribution legend.jpg

Species richness

Species richness by country based on regional taxon lists (countries with darker colours are more species-rich). View Data

Carebara Species Richness.png

Biology

Fischer et al. (2015) - The ant genus Carebara is highly diverse with about 250 named taxa to date (Bolton 2014), while the true diversity is probably much higher due to a large number of undescribed species (Fischer et al. 2014). For the vast majority of this diversity virtually nothing is known about their respective ecologies, and data about species’ biogeographic distributions is still incomplete. Apart from the conspicuous, mass-raiding marauder ants of the former genus Pheidologeton (now Carebara, see Fischer et al. 2014), most of the species are minute in size, often with very cryptic lifestyles, making field observation difficult.

Undersampling in many tropical and sub-tropical areas and especially in non-epigaeic strata is still a major issue for Carebara taxonomy and biogeography, and contributes to major gaps in our knowledge. Hence, more ecological and taxonomic studies in these areas are needed in order to better understand the evolution and biology of this interesting and diverse genus.

As in the hyperdiverse genus Pheidole Westwood, workers of many Carebara species are divided into two distinct subcastes, minor and major workers (or soldiers), with additonal subcastes and intermediates present in several species (Azorsa and Fisher in revision, Fischer et al. 2014). While the major workers’ most important tasks are chopping and transportation of larger prey and the defence of foraging trails and the nest, the main function of phragmotic workers is blocking nest entrances against intrusion of other predatory ants and invertebrates (Hölldobler and Wilson 1990).

Arabian Peninsula

Sharaf and Aldwood (2013) - Little taxonomic or biological information is available on the genus Carebara throughout its range (Bharti and Kumar 2013), especially in the Arabian Peninsula (Aldawood et al. 2011). The scarcity of information may be due to the cryptic nature of species, tiny body size, and the difficulty in collecting these ants requiring leaf litter sifting and the use of Berlese funnels for extraction. Members of the genus are subterranean and often associated with decaying wood and leaf litter (Bolton 1973, Longino 2004, Aldawood et al. 2011, Bharti and Kumar 2013).

Carebara was originally recorded from the Arabian Peninsula by Collingwood and van Harten (2001) with their description of Oligomyrmex arabicus based on minor and major workers collected from Al Kawd, near Abyan, Republic of Yemen. Ten years later, we described a new species of Carebara, C. abuhurayri Sharaf & Aldawood based on minor workers from the southwestern mountains of Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) (Aldawood et al. 2011).

Several nest series of a species very similar to C. arabica were collected from four different localities in the southwestern region of KSA. Minor and major workers matched the brief original description of C. arabica. In addition, two major workers of C. abuhurayri were collected from its type locality and are very similar to the major workers of C. arabica. Further comparisons of this newly collected material indicated that C. abuhurayri is a synonym of C. arabicus.

Minor workers of another Carebara species that appeared to be undescribed were collected from Riyadh, KSA. Repeated efforts to find nests of this species that contained all castes were unsuccessful; however, a colony that contained minor and major workers and several alate queens (males unknown) was collected in eastern KSA, confirming the novelty of this taxon.

Castes

Fischer et al. (2014) - Carebara workers may be monomorphic, dimorphic, or continuously polymorphic. When the latter is the case, there are often several subcastes intermediate between minor and large major workers. Intermediate workers of some marauder ant species in the former genus Pheidologeton differ gradually in size and general morphology. In other species with polymorphic workers (e.g. in several former Oligomyrmex) the morphological differences are less gradual, with little variation in the minor workers, but with one to several different major worker phenotypes that differ in size and morphology.

Some species, like Carebara elmenteitae from Kenya, Carebara nayana from India and Carebara butteli from Sri Lanka, however, have an additional major worker subcaste with phragmotic heads, which represent a special defense line against predators and are often described as living plugs for nest entrances.

Fernández 2006 - Longino (2004) calls attention to the paucity of samples of Carebara (lignata group) with both workers and soldiers. In other myrmicine ants like Pheidole or Solenopsis it is not difficult to find workers and soldiers in the field, which suggests that soldiers of Carebara are not present in the same foraging strata as workers. This suggests that, to obtain soldiers of Carebara, we need to dig in the soil or look for them in rotten logs (Longino 2004). The fact that many museums only have minor workers of the typical Carebara (that is, the lignata species group) could be due to the reason pointed out above, and in reality all of the species of this complex may be dimorphic. The exasperating monotony of the minor workers of the lignata species group (some of them only 0.90 mm long!) makes it desirable to obtain and to study collections that include soldiers, besides females and males. If my prediction is correct, and all the species of the lignata group possess major workers (although difficult to collect), it should be possible to revise the group on a global scale.

Finally, I want to call attention to the interesting intercaste phenomenon in this group. Kusnezov (1952) and Wheeler (1925) pointed out and described cases of intermediates between major workers (soldiers) and females. The great plasticity in the external attributes of the soldiers of the lignata species group (such as the presence / absence of ocelli and eyes, and vestigial alary sclerites) make this an ideal group for the study of the evolution of caste intergradations; as proposed by Baroni Urbani and Passera (1996), who suggest that in some cases the soldier developed not from the worker, but from the female (see Ward 1997 for a reply).

Nomenclature

The following information is derived from Barry Bolton's New General Catalogue, a catalogue of the world's ants.

  • CAREBARA [Myrmicinae: Solenopsidini]
    • Carebara Westwood, 1840b: 86. Type-species: Carebara lignata, by monotypy.
    • Carebara senior synonym of Aeromyrma, Afroxyidris, Aneleus, Crateropsis, Erebomyrma, Hendecatella, Lecanomyrma, Neoblepharidatta, Nimbamyrma, Oligomyrmex, Paedalgus, Solenops, Spelaeomyrmex, Sporocleptes: Fernández, 2004a: 194.
    • Carebara senior synonym of Parvimyrma: Fernández, 2010: 195.
    • Carebara senior synonym of Pheidologeton: Fischer, Azorsa & Fisher, 2014: 63.
  • AEROMYRMA [junior synonym of Carebara]
    • Aeromyrma Forel, 1891b: 198. Type-species: Aeromyrma nosindambo, by monotypy.
    • [Aeromyrma also described as new by Forel, 1891a: cccvii; no species-rank taxa named.]
    • Aeromyrma subgenus of Oligomyrmex: Emery, 1915c: 59 (footnote).
    • Aeromyrma revived status as genus: Arnold, 1916: 256.
    • Aeromyrma subgenus of Oligomyrmex: Emery, 1924d: 215.
    • Aeromyrma junior synonym of Oligomyrmex: Ettershank, 1966: 119.
    • Aeromyrma junior synonym of Carebara: Fernández, 2004a: 194.
  • AFROXYIDRIS [junior synonym of Carebara]
    • Afroxyidris Belshaw & Bolton, 1994: 631. Type-species: Afroxyidris crigensis, by original designation.
    • Afroxyidris junior synonym of Carebara: Fernández, 2004a: 194.
  • ANELEUS [junior synonym of Carebara]
    • Aneleus Emery, 1900c: 327 [as subgenus of Pheidologeton]. Type-species: Solenopsis similis, by subsequent designation of Wheeler, W.M. 1911f: 158.
    • [Type-species not Pheidologeton pygmaeus, unjustified subsequent designation by Wheeler, W.M. 1913a: 77; repeated in Emery, 1924d: 214.]
    • Aneleus raised to genus: Emery, 1914a: 41.
    • Aneleus senior synonym of Sporocleptes: Consani, 1951: 169; Arnold, 1952a: 460.
    • Aneleus junior synonym of Oligomyrmex: Ettershank, 1966: 119.
    • Aneleus junior synonym of Carebara: Fernández, 2004a: 194.
  • CRATEROPSIS [junior synonym of Carebara]
    • Crateropsis Patrizi, 1948: 174 [as subgenus of Solenopsis]. Type-species: Solenopsis (Crateropsis) elmenteitae, by original designation.
    • Crateropsis junior synonym of Oligomyrmex: Ettershank, 1966: 120.
    • Crateropsis junior synonym of Carebara: Fernández, 2004a: 194.
  • EREBOMYRMA [junior synonym of Carebara]
    • Erebomyrma Wheeler, W.M. 1903a: 138. Type-species: Erebomyrma longii, by monotypy.
    • Erebomyrma senior synonym of Spelaeomyrmex: Wilson, 1962a: 63.
    • Erebomyrma junior synonym of Oligomyrmex: Ettershank, 1966: 119.
    • Erebomyrma revived from synonymy: Wilson, 1986b: 61.
    • Erebomyrma returned to synonymy of Oligomyrmex: Bolton, 1994: 106; Bolton, 1995b: 298.
    • Erebomyrma junior synonym of Carebara: Fernández, 2004a: 194.
  • HENDECATELLA [junior synonym of Carebara]
    • Hendecatella Wheeler, W.M. 1927h: 93 [as subgenus of Oligomyrmex]. Type-species: Oligomyrmex (Hendecatella) capreolus, by monotypy.
    • Hendecatella junior synonym of Oligomyrmex: Ettershank, 1966: 119.
    • Hendecatella junior synonym of Carebara: Fernández, 2004a: 194.
  • LECANOMYRMA [junior synonym of Carebara]
    • Lecanomyrma Forel, 1913k: 56 [as subgenus of Pheidologeton]. Type-species: Pheidologeton (Lecanomyrma) butteli, by monotypy.
    • Lecanomyrma subgenus of Aneleus: Emery, 1924d: 215.
    • Lecanomyrma junior synonym of Oligomyrmex: Ettershank, 1966: 119.
    • Lecanomyrma junior synonym of Carebara: Fernández, 2004a: 194.
  • NEOBLEPHARIDATTA [junior synonym of Carebara]
    • Neoblepharidatta Sheela & Narendran, 1997: 88. Type-species: Neoblepharidatta nayana, by original designation.
    • Neoblepharidatta junior synonym of Oligomyrmex: Bolton, 2003: 216, 273.
    • Neoblepharidatta junior synonym of Carebara: Fernández, 2004a: 194.
  • NIMBAMYRMA [junior synonym of Carebara]
    • Nimbamyrma Bernard, 1953b: 240. Type-species: Nimbamyrma villiersi, by monotypy.
    • Nimbamyrma junior synonym of Oligomyrmex: Ettershank, 1966: 120.
    • Nimbamyrma junior synonym of Carebara: Fernández, 2004a: 194.
  • OLIGOMYRMEX [junior synonym of Carebara]
    • Oligomyrmex Mayr, 1867a: 110. Type-species: Oligomyrmex concinnus, by monotypy.
    • Oligomyrmex senior synonym of Aeromyrma, Aneleus (and its junior synonym Sporocleptes), Crateropsis, Hendecatella, Lecanomyrma, Nimbamyrma, Solenops: Ettershank, 1966: 119; Smith, D.R. 1979: 1389.
    • Oligomyrmex senior synonym of Erebomyrma (and its junior synonym Spelaeomyrmex): Bolton, 1994: 106.
    • Oligomyrmex senior synonym of Neoblepharidatta: Bolton, 2003: 216, 273.
    • Oligomyrmex junior synonym of Carebara: Fernández, 2004a: 194.
  • PAEDALGUS [junior synonym of Carebara]
    • Paedalgus Forel, 1911i: 217. Type-species: Paedalgus escherichi, by monotypy.
    • Paedalgus junior synonym of Carebara: Fernández, 2004a: 194.
  • PARVIMYRMA [junior synonym of Carebara]
    • Parvimyrma Eguchi & Bui, 2007: 40. Type-species: Parvimyrma sangi, by original designation.
    • Parvimyrma junior synonym of Carebara: Fernández, 2010: 195.
  • SOLENOPS [junior synonym of Carebara]
    • Solenops Karavaiev, 1930a: 207 [as subgenus of Solenopsis]. Type-species: Solenopsis (Solenops) weyeri, by monotypy.
    • Solenops junior synonym of Oligomyrmex: Ettershank, 1966: 119.
    • Solenops junior synonym of Carebara: Fernández, 2004a: 194.
  • SPELAEOMYRMEX [junior synonym of Carebara]
    • Spelaeomyrmex Wheeler, W.M. 1922c: 9. Type-species: Spelaeomyrmex urichi, by original designation.
    • Spelaeomyrmex junior synonym of Erebomyrma: Wilson, 1962: 63.
    • Spelaeomyrmex junior synonym of Oligomyrmex: Bolton, 1994: 106.
    • Spelaeomyrmex junior synonym of Carebara: Fernández, 2004a: 194.
  • SPOROCLEPTES [junior synonym of Carebara]
    • Sporocleptes Arnold, 1948: 219. Type-species: Sporocleptes nicotianae, by original designation.
    • Sporocleptes junior synonym of Aneleus: Consani, 1951: 169; Arnold, 1952a: 460.
    • Sporocleptes junior synonym of Oligomyrmex: Ettershank, 1966: 119.
    • Sporocleptes junior synonym of Carebara: Fernández, 2004a: 194.
  • PHEIDOLOGETON [junior synonym of Carebara]
    • Pheidologeton Mayr, 1862: 750. Type-species: Oecodoma diversa, by subsequent designation of Bingham, 1903: 160.
    • Pheidologeton senior synonym of Phidologeton: Wheeler, W.M. 1922a: 880.
    • Pheidologeton senior synonym of Amauromyrmex, Idrisella: Ettershank, 1966: 115.
    • Pheidologeton junior synonym of Carebara: Fischer, Azorsa & Fisher, 2014: 63.
  • AMAUROMYRMEX [junior synonym of Carebara]
    • Amauromyrmex Wheeler, W.M. 1929b: 1. Type-species: Amauromyrmex speculifrons (junior synonym of Pheidole silenus), by original designation.
    • Amauromyrmex junior synonym of Pheidologeton: Ettershank, 1966: 115.
  • IDRISELLA [junior synonym of Carebara]
    • Idrisella Santschi, 1937h: 372. Type-species: Pheidologeton dentiviris, by original designation.
    • Idrisella junior synonym of Pheidologeton: Ettershank, 1966: 115.
  • PHIDOLOGETON [junior synonym of Carebara]
    • Phidologeton Bingham, 1903: 160, unjustified emendation of Pheidologeton.
    • Phidologeton junior synonym of Pheidologeton: Wheeler, W.M. 1922a: 880.

Worker

Fischer et al. (2014)

1. Antenna with eight to eleven segments and a two-segmented club.

2. Clypeus of minor workers usually with four distinct setae (some species with a central isolated seta).

3. Mandibles of workers triangular or subtriangular and usually with four to seven teeth or denticles present (3 teeth in Carebara crigensis (Belshaw and Bolton 1994)), the apical and preapical tooth often larger than the following ones.

4. Palp formula 2,2 or 1,2.

5. Frontal lobes separated by median part of clypeus.

6. Eyes either absent or reduced to one or few ommatidia and situated anterior of cephalic midlength, or larger, not reduced, and situated at or posterior of cephalic midlength.

7. Antennal scrobes absent, weakly developed only in species with workers with phragmotic head.

8. Frontal carinae varying from absent to weakly developed and short to very rarely reaching beyond cephalic midlength, but never extending towards posterior head margin.

9. Promesonotal dorsum in profile convex to weakly convex, very rarely near-linear.

10. Propodeum often with a pair of spines, short teeth or angulate posterior corners, in which cases often with a lamella reaching down towards propodeal lobes, but sometimes propodeum posteriorly completely unarmed and rounded.

11. Petiole with a distinct peduncle and well-differentiated node.

12. Different worker subcastes in dimorphic and polymorphic species, sometimes with enormous size variation (e.g. in C. polita group and in many former Pheidologeton).

13. Major workers, where present and especially when large, often with at least a few small remnants of queen flight sclerites present, and some polita group and former Pheidologeton major workers with all flight sclerites recognizable.

References

  • Arnold, G. 1916. A monograph of the Formicidae of South Africa. Part II. Ponerinae, Dorylinae. Ann. S. Afr. Mus. 14: 159-270 (page 248, Carebara in Myrmicinae, Pheidologetini)
  • Ashmead, W. H. 1905c. A skeleton of a new arrangement of the families, subfamilies, tribes and genera of the ants, or the superfamily Formicoidea. Can. Entomol. 37: 381-384 (page 383, Carebara in Myrmicinae, Myrmicariini)
  • Bolton, B. 1987. A review of the Solenopsis genus-group and revision of Afrotropical Monomorium Mayr (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). Bull. Br. Mus. (Nat. Hist.) Entomol. 54: 263-452 (page 265, Carebara in Myrmicinae, Pheidologeton genus group)
  • Bolton, B. 1994. Identification guide to the ant genera of the world. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 222 pp. (page 106, Carebara in Myrmicinae, Pheidologetini [Pheidologetonini])
  • Bolton, B. 2003. Synopsis and Classification of Formicidae. Mem. Am. Entomol. Inst. 71: 370pp (page 209, Carebara in Myrmicinae, Solenopsidini)
  • Dalla Torre, K. W. von. 1893. Catalogus Hymenopterorum hucusque descriptorum systematicus et synonymicus. Vol. 7. Formicidae (Heterogyna). Leipzig: W. Engelmann, 289 pp. (page 74, Carebara in Myrmicinae)
  • Dlussky, G. M.; Fedoseeva, E. B. 1988. Origin and early stages of evolution in ants. Pp. 70-144 in: Ponomarenko, A. G. (ed.) Cretaceous biocenotic crisis and insect evolution. Moskva: Nauka, 232 pp. (page 80, Carebara in Myrmicinae, Pheidologetini)
  • Emery, C. 1877b. Saggio di un ordinamento naturale dei Mirmicidei, e considerazioni sulla filogenesi delle formiche. Bull. Soc. Entomol. Ital. 9: 67-83 (page 81, Carebara in Myrmicinae, Pheidolini [Myrmicidae, Pheidolidae])
  • Emery, C. 1895l. Die Gattung Dorylus Fab. und die systematische Eintheilung der Formiciden. Zool. Jahrb. Abt. Syst. Geogr. Biol. Tiere 8: 685-778 (page 770, Carebara in Myrmicinae, Solenopsidini)
  • Emery, C. 1914e. Intorno alla classificazione dei Myrmicinae. Rend. Sess. R. Accad. Sci. Ist. Bologna Cl. Sci. Fis. (n.s.) 18: 29-42 (page 41, Carebara in Myrmicinae, Pheidologetini)
  • Emery, C. 1924f [1922]. Hymenoptera. Fam. Formicidae. Subfam. Myrmicinae. [concl.]. Genera Insectorum 174C: 207-397 (page 219, Carebara in Myrmicinae, Pheidologetini)
  • Ettershank, G. 1966. A generic revision of the world Myrmicinae related to Solenopsis and Pheidologeton (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). Aust. J. Zool. 14: 73-171 (page 81, 125, Carebara in Myrmicinae, Pheidologeton genus group; Review of genus)
  • Fischer, G., Azorsa, F. & Fisher, B.L. 2014. The ant genus Carebara Westwood (Hymenoptera, Formicidae): synonymisation of Pheidologeton Mayr under Carebara, establishment and revision of the C. polita species group. ZooKeys 438:57–112. doi:10.3897/zookeys.438.7922
  • Fischer, G., Zorsa, F., Hita Garcia, F., Mikheyev, A. and Economo, E. 2015. Two new phragmotic ant species from Africa: morphology and next-generation sequencing solve a caste association problem in the genus Carebara Westwood. ZooKeys. 525:77–105. PDF
  • Fernández, F. 2004a. The American species of the myrmicine ant genus Carebara Westwood (Hymentoptera: Formicidae). Caldasia 26(1): 191-238 (page 194, Carebara senior synonym of Aeromyrma, Afroxyidris, Aneleus, Crateropsis, Erebomyrma, Hendecatella, Lecanomyrma, Neoblepharidatta, Nimbamyrma, Oligomyrmex, Paedalgus, Solenops, Spelaeomyrmex, Sporocleptes)
  • Fernández, F. 2006. A new species of Carebara Westwood and taxonomic notes on the genus. Revista Colombiana de Entomologia. 32:97-99. PDF
  • Forel, A. 1893b. Sur la classification de la famille des Formicides, avec remarques synonymiques. Ann. Soc. Entomol. Belg. 37: 161-167 (page 164, Carebara in Myrmicinae, Solenopsidini)
  • Forel, A. 1917. Cadre synoptique actuel de la faune universelle des fourmis. Bull. Soc. Vaudoise Sci. Nat. 51: 229-253 (page 244, Carebara in Myrmicinae, Pheidologetini)
  • Hölldobler, B.; Wilson, E. O. 1990. The ants. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, xii + 732 pp. (page 16, Carebara in Myrmicinae, Pheidologetini)
  • Jaffe, K. 1993. El mundo de las hormigas. Baruta, Venezuela: Equinoccio (Ediciones de la Universidad Simón Bolívar), 188 pp. (page 10, Carebara in Myrmicinae, Solenopsidini)
  • Kempf, W. W. 1972b. Catálogo abreviado das formigas da regia~o Neotropical. Stud. Entomol. 15: 3-344 (page 74, Carebara in Myrmicinae, Solenopsidini)
  • Kusnezov, N. 1964 [1963]. Zoogeografía de las hormigas en Sudamérica. Acta Zool. Lilloana 19: 25-186 (page 61, Carebara in Myrmicinae, Solenopsidini)
  • Mayr, G. 1865. Formicidae. In: Reise der Österreichischen Fregatte "Novara" um die Erde in den Jahren 1857, 1858, 1859. Zoologischer Theil. Bd. II. Abt. 1. Wien: K. Gerold's Sohn, 119 pp. (page 23, Carebara in Myrmicinae [Myrmicidae])
  • Smith, F. 1858a. Catalogue of hymenopterous insects in the collection of the British Museum. Part VI. Formicidae. London: British Museum, 216 pp. (page 178, Carebara in Poneridae, Attidae)
  • Smith, F. 1871a. A catalogue of the Aculeate Hymenoptera and Ichneumonidae of India and the Eastern Archipelago. With introductory remarks by A. R. Wallace. [part]. J. Linn. Soc. Lond. Zool. 11: 285-348 (page 334, Carebara in Myrmicinae [Myrmicidae])
  • Westwood, J. O. 1840b. Observations on the genus Typhlopone, with descriptions of several exotic species of ants. Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. 6: 81-89 (page 86, Carebara as genus)
  • Wheeler, W. M. 1910b. Ants: their structure, development and behavior. New York: Columbia University Press, xxv + 663 pp. (page 140, Carebara in Myrmicinae, Solenopsidini)
  • Wheeler, W. M. 1922b. Ants of the American Museum Congo expedition. A contribution to the myrmecology of Africa. II. The ants collected by the American Museum Congo Expedition. Bull. Am. Mus. Nat. Hist. 45: 39-269 (page 172, Key to Afrotropical species)
  • Wheeler, W. M. 1922i. Ants of the American Museum Congo expedition. A contribution to the myrmecology of Africa. VII. Keys to the genera and subgenera of ants. Bull. Am. Mus. Nat. Hist. 45: 631-710 (page 663, Carebara in Myrmicinae, Solenopsidini)