Formica species groups

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A beginning on organizing some resources related to the many groupings of Formica species.......

Coptiformica

Seifert (2000) - The Palaearctic subgenus Coptoformica Mueller, 1923 belongs to the ant genus Formica and is most probably monophyletic.

cinerea

One of three species groups within the subgenus Serviformica showing reddish pigmentation on mesosoma, varying in size from small patches to complete surface coverage. F. cinerea is Eurocaucasian and characterised by large setae numbers on posterior vertex and underside of head, large eyes and narrow petioles. (Seifert and Schultz 2009)

Formica cinerea group - definition of group, member species, etc.

Key to Formica cinerea group

exsecta

two North American species (this is an incomplete list of species in this group):

fusca

Distinguished by one or two offset teeth at the base of the mandibles.

Some North American species:

microgyna

neoformica/neogagates

a few North American species:

neorufibarbis

pallidefulva

Trager et al (2007) - The Formica pallidefulva species group is endemic to eastern and central United States, with two species extending west into the Great Plains and lower elevations in the Rocky Mountains and north into eastern Canada.

rufa

rufibarbis

One of three species groups within the subgenus Serviformica showing reddish pigmentation on mesosoma, varying in size from small patches to complete surface coverage. F. rufibarbis European to East Asian and characterised by the reduction of setae on posterior vertex and underside of head, smaller eyes and wider petioles. (Seifert and Schultz 2009)

sanguinea

subpilosa

One of three species groups within the subgenus Serviformica showing reddish pigmentation on mesosoma, varying in size from small patches to complete surface coverage. F. subpilosa is West to Central Asian and charaterised by intermediate setae numbers on posterior vertex and underside of head, smaller eyes and wider petioles. (Seifert and Schultz 2009)

wood ants

References