Key to Tetramorium inglebyi-group species

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This worker key is based on: Gaurav Agavekar, G., Hita Garcia, F., Economo, E.P. 2017. Taxonomic overview of the hyperdiverse ant genus Tetramorium Mayr (Hymenoptera, Formicidae) in India with descriptions and X-ray microtomography of two new species from the Andaman Islands. PeerJ 5:e3800 (DOI 10.7717/peerj.3800).

This is a small species group of Tetramorium species with all known members from India.

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Figure 13 Differences in eye size, propodeal spines, and petiole shape. Head in full-face view (eyes within ellipses) (A) T. inglebyi (CASENT0280897), (B) T. elisabethae (CASENT0909166), (C) T. inglebyi (CASENT0280897), (D) T. triangulatum, (E) T. jarawa sp. n. (NCBSAV761). Mesosoma in profile view (F, G) and dorsum of waist segments (H, I). Arrows indicate propodeal spines/teeth and petiole. (F) T. elisabethae (CASENT0901107), (G) T. jarawa sp. n. (NCBS-AV761), (H) T. elisabethae (CASENT0901107), (I) T. jarawa sp. n. (NCBS-AV761). Images (except E, G and I) by Estella Ortega, Will Ericson, and Zach Lieberman; from https://www.antweb.org.
Figure 14 Differences in petiole shape, sculpturing on mesosoma, and propodeal spines. Petiole within ellipses in profile view (A, B) and arrows indicating sculpturation on dorsum of mesosoma (C, D). (A, C) T. elisabethae (CASENT0901107), (B, D) T. triangulatum (reproduced from Bharti and Kumar, 2012). Petiole (lamella in ellipse) and propodeal spines (indicated by arrows) in profile view. (E) T. myops (CASENT0901106), (F) T. jarawa sp. n. (NCBS-AV761). Images (A, C, E) by Zach Lieberman and Ryan Perry; from https://www.antweb.org. Images (B, D) from Bharti & Kumar (2012).
  • Eyes large, always longer than maximum width of antennal scapes (Fig. 13A) . . . . . Tetramorium inglebyi
  • Eyes much smaller than above, always shorter than maximum width of antennal scapes (Figs. 13B–13E) . . . . . 2

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  • Propodeal spines relatively shorter (Fig. 13F); dorsum of petiolar node in dorsal view conspicuously much broader than long (Fig. 13H); procoxae never completely reticulate–punctate . . . . . 3
  • Propodeal spines relatively longer (Fig. 13G); dorsum of petiolar node in dorsal view about as long as broad or clearly longer than broad (Fig. 13I); procoxae completely reticulate–punctate . . . . . 4

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  • In profile petiolar node appearing higher and thinner (Fig. 14A); dorsum of promesonotum reticulate–rugose (Fig. 14C); first gastral tergite unsculptured, smooth and shiny . . . . . Tetramorium elisabethae
  • In profile petiolar node appearing thicker and more compact (Fig. 14B); dorsum of promesonotum longitudinally rugulose (Fig. 14D); base of first gastral tergite longitudinally rugulose . . . . . Tetramorium triangulatum

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  • Propodeum with comparatively longer spines (Fig. 14E); in profile peduncle of petiole with large anteroventral lamella; shape of petiolar node narrowing from base to apex and dorsum convex (Fig. 14E) . . . . . Tetramorium myops
  • Propodeum with comparatively shorter spines (Fig. 14F); in profile peduncle of petiole without large anteroventral lamella; shape of petiolar node appearing square and dorsum straight (Fig. 14F) . . . . . Tetramorium jarawa