Pheidole argentina

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Pheidole argentina
Conservation status
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Class: Insecta
Order: Hymenoptera
Family: Formicidae
Subfamily: Myrmicinae
Tribe: Attini
Genus: Pheidole
Species: P. argentina
Binomial name
Pheidole argentina
(Bruch, 1932)

A permanent workerless parasite of Pheidole nitidula. (Wilson 2003)

Identification

The original line drawing from Bruch (1932):

Pheidole-argentina-bruch.jpg

See the description in the nomenclature section.

Keys including this Species

Distribution

Only known from the type locality.

Distribution based on Regional Taxon Lists

Neotropical Region: Argentina (type locality).

Distribution based on AntMaps

AntMapLegend.png

Distribution based on AntWeb specimens

Check data from AntWeb

Biology

Castes

This species is a workerless parasite.

Nomenclature

The following information is derived from Barry Bolton's New General Catalogue, a catalogue of the world's ants.

  • argentina. Gallardomyrma argentina Bruch, 1932: 273, figs. 1-8 (q.) ARGENTINA. Combination in Pheidole: Wilson, 1984: 327. See also: Wilson, 2003: 267.

Unless otherwise noted the text for the remainder of this section is reported from the publication that includes the original description.

Description

From Wilson (2003): An extreme workerless parasite of Pheidole nitidula. The queen possesses a trait unique within the ants: the antenna is 10-segmented, with a well-developed, 1-segmented club. Also, the body is somewhat pupiform and the mandibles are reduced to toothless straps.

MEASUREMENTS (mm) Syntype queen: according to Bruch (1932), the total length of a queen in the type series is 1.7 mm.

COLOR Head, especially vertex, brownish yellow; mesosoma, waist, and gaster (except the apex) grayish brown.


Pheidole argentina Wilson 2003.jpg

Figure. Syntype, queen. (Adapted from Bruch 1932.) Scale bars = 1 mm.

Type Material

ARGENTINA: Alta Gracia (La Granja), Sierra de Córdoba, col. Carlos Bruch. Museo de La Plata, Argentina - as reported in Wilson (2003)

Etymology

Named after the country of origin. (Wilson 2003)

References