Anochetus emarginatus

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Anochetus emarginatus
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Class: Insecta
Order: Hymenoptera
Family: Formicidae
Subfamily: Ponerinae
Tribe: Ponerini
Genus: Anochetus
Species: A. emarginatus
Binomial name
Anochetus emarginatus
(Fabricius, 1804)

Anochetus emarginatus casent0217503 p 1 high.jpg

Anochetus emarginatus casent0217503 d 1 high.jpg

Specimen Labels

Synonyms

Anochetus emarginatus is an arboreal or semi-arboreal forager that often nests in hollow branches, epiphytes, or between palm leaf bases well above ground level (Brown 1978).

At a Glance • Ergatoid queen  

 

Identification

Keys including this Species

Distribution

Distribution based on Regional Taxon Lists

Neotropical Region: Brazil, Colombia, French Guiana, Grenada, Guyana, Lesser Antilles, Mexico, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, Venezuela.


Distribution based on AntMaps

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Distribution based on AntWeb specimens

Check data from AntWeb

Biology

Gibson et al. (2018) found Anochetus horridus and Anochetus emarginatus have slower strikes relative to the other species of Anochetus and Odontomachus, reaching mean maximum rotational velocity and acceleration of around 1.3 9 10 4 rad s -1 and 2 9 10 8 rad s -2, respectively. The mass-specific power output of these and other species in these two genera confirm their mandible strikes are power amplified, i.e., in addition to muscle contraction energy, the acceleration of the mandibles is enhanced by mechanical structures that are adapted for, and form part of, their trap-jaws. These species and other measured species in Anochetus and Odontomachus follow a pattern of increasingly energetic strikes with larger body mass. This relationship appears to be primarily driven by an increase in mandible mass with larger body size.

Castes

Worker

Nomenclature

The following information is derived from Barry Bolton's Online Catalogue of the Ants of the World.

  • emarginatus. Myrmecia emarginata Fabricius, 1804: 426 (w.) (no state data, “Habitat in America meridionali”).
    • Type-material: holotype(?) worker.
    • [Note: no indication of number of specimens is given.]
    • Type-locality: Neotropical (no locality specified).
    • Type-depository: ZMUC.
    • Forel, 1912c: 30 (m.); Wheeler, G.C. & Wheeler, J. 1952c: 644 (l.).
    • Combination in Odontomachus: Illiger, 1807: 194;
    • combination in Stenomyrmex: Mayr, 1862: 712;
    • combination in Anochetus (Stenomyrmex): Emery, 1890a: 63.
    • Status as species: Roger, 1861a: 32; Mayr, 1862: 712; Roger, 1862c: 289; Roger, 1863b: 22; Mayr, 1863: 454; Emery, 1890a: 63; Dalla Torre, 1893: 47; Emery, 1894c: 186 (in key); Forel, 1895b: 117; Forel, 1899c: 18; Wheeler, W.M. 1911b: 168; Emery, 1911d: 111; Forel, 1912c: 30; Mann, 1916: 418; Crawley, 1916b: 367; Wheeler, W.M. 1916c: 3; Wheeler, W.M. 1916d: 324; Wheeler, W.M. 1918b: 24; Wheeler, W.M. 1922c: 3; Borgmeier, 1923: 76; Wheeler, W.M. 1923a: 3; Wheeler, W.M. 1925a: 9 (in key); Borgmeier, 1934: 96; Wheeler, W.M. 1942: 156; Kempf, 1964f: 238; Kempf, 1970b: 327; Kempf, 1972a: 21; Brown, 1978c: 556, 609; Bolton, 1995b: 64; Zabala, 2008: 131; Fernández & Guerrero, 2019: 516.
    • Senior synonym of quadrispinosus: Roger, 1861a: 32; Roger, 1862c: 289; Roger, 1863b: 22; Mayr, 1863: 454; Emery, 1890a: 63; Forel, 1895b: 117; Emery, 1911d: 111; Borgmeier, 1923: 76; Kempf, 1964f: 238; Kempf, 1972a: 21; Brown, 1978c: 556; Bolton, 1995b: 64.
    • Senior synonym of rugosus Emery: Kempf, 1964f: 238; Kempf, 1972a: 21; Brown, 1978c: 556; Bolton, 1995b: 64.
    • Distribution: Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Granada, Guianas, Trinidad, Venezuela.
  • quadrispinosus. Odontomachus quadrispinosus Smith, F. 1858b: 78, pl. 5, figs. 15-17 (w.) BRAZIL (no state data).
    • Type-material: holotype worker.
    • [Note: in BMNH are two quadrispinosus workers with the data, “Para 48/133.” The Accessions. Register for 1848 no. 133 has, “Para. B(ought)t of Stevens. Collected by Mssrs Bates & Wallace.” One of these specimens is sublabelled “172.” It is suspected that all three together constituted the original syntype series.]
    • Type-locality: Brazil (no further data).
    • Type-depository: BMNH.
    • Junior synonym of emarginatus: Roger, 1861a: 32; Roger, 1862c: 289; Roger, 1863b: 22; Mayr, 1863: 454; Emery, 1890a: 63; Forel, 1895b: 117; Emery, 1911d: 111; Borgmeier, 1923: 76; Kempf, 1964f: 238; Kempf, 1972a: 21; Brown, 1978c: 556; Bolton, 1995b: 65.
  • rugosus. Anochetus (Stenomyrmex) emarginatus r. rugosus Emery, 1890a: 63 (w.) BRAZIL (Pará, Mato Grosso).
    • Type-material: syntype workers (number not stated).
    • Type-localities: Brazil: Pará, and Mato Grosso (no collector’s name(s)).
    • Type-depository: MSNG.
    • [Unresolved junior secondary homonym of Odontomachus rugosus Smith, F. 1857a: 65 (Bolton, 1995b: 65).]
    • Mann, 1916: 418 (m.); Wheeler, G.C. & Wheeler, J. 1952c: 645 (l.).
    • Status as species: Dalla Torre, 1893: 48.
    • Subspecies of emarginatus: Emery, in Dalla Torre, 1893: 47 (footnote); Emery, 1894c: 186 (in key); Emery, 1906c: 117; Emery, 1911d: 111; Mann, 1916: 418; Borgmeier, 1923: 76; Wheeler, W.M. 1923a: 3; Wheeler, W.M. 1925a: 10 (in key).
    • Junior synonym of emarginatus: Kempf, 1964f: 238; Kempf, 1972a: 21; Brown, 1978c: 556; Bolton, 1995b: 65.

The following notes on F. Smith type specimens have been provided by Barry Bolton (details):

Odontomachus quadrispinosus

Holotype worker in The Natural History Museum. Labelled “Brazil” and also with a Farren White label. It is probable that this determination is spurious, a secondary labelling by Farren White, who seems to have had a habit of throwing away original data labels and substituting his own. Also in The Natural History Museum are two quadrispinosus workers with the data, “Para 48/133.” Acc. Reg.: “1848 no. 133. Para. Bt of Stevens. Collected by Mssrs Bates & Wallace.” One of these specimens is sublabelled “172.” I suspect that all three together constituted the original syntype series.

Description

References

References based on Global Ant Biodiversity Informatics

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  • Brown Jr., W.L. 1978. Contributions toward a reclassification of the Formicidae. Part VI. Ponerinae, Tribe Ponerini, Subtribe Odontomachiti, Section B. Genus Anochetus and Bibliography. Studia Entomologia 20(1-4): 549-XXX
  • Brown W.L. Jr. 1978. Contributions toward a reclassification of the Formicidae. Part VI. Ponerinae, tribe Ponerini, subtribe Odontomachiti. Section B. Genus Anochetus and bibliography. Studia Ent. 20(1-4): 549-638.
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  • CSIRO Collection
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