Myrmica alaskensis

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Myrmica alaskensis
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Class: Insecta
Order: Hymenoptera
Family: Formicidae
Subfamily: Myrmicinae
Tribe: Myrmicini
Genus: Myrmica
Species: M. alaskensis
Binomial name
Myrmica alaskensis
Wheeler, W.M., 1917

Myrmica alaskensis casent0104830 profile 1.jpg

Myrmica alaskensis casent0104830 dorsal 1.jpg

Specimen labels

Synonyms

A boreal species widespread across northern North America, this species is a host for the xenobiotic ant Formicoxenus quebecensis and the workerless inquilines Myrmica lampra and Myrmica quebecensis.

At a Glance • Polygynous  

 

Identification

Keys including this Species

Distribution

Latitudinal Distribution Pattern

Latitudinal Range: 68.2° to 43.486°.

 
North
Temperate
North
Subtropical
Tropical South
Subtropical
South
Temperate

Distribution based on Regional Taxon Lists

Nearctic Region: Canada, United States (type locality).

Distribution based on AntMaps

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Distribution based on AntWeb specimens

Check data from AntWeb

Countries Occupied

Number of countries occupied by this species based on AntWiki Regional Taxon Lists. In general, fewer countries occupied indicates a narrower range, while more countries indicates a more widespread species.

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Biology

Life History Traits

  • Queen number: polygynous (Frumhoff & Ward, 1992)

Castes

Nomenclature

The following information is derived from Barry Bolton's Online Catalogue of the Ants of the World.

  • alaskensis. Myrmica brevinodis var. alaskensis Wheeler, W.M. 1917a: 503 (w.) U.S.A. Junior synonym of kuschei: Creighton, 1950a: 97; of brevinodis: Weber, 1950b: 189; Smith, M.R. 1951a: 789. Revived from synonymy, raised to species and senior synonym of kuschei: Francoeur, 1986b: 57.
  • kuschei. Myrmica brevinodis var. kuschei Wheeler, W.M. 1917e: 17 (w.q.) U.S.A. Subspecies of brevinodis: Weber, 1950b: 197. Raised to species: Francoeur, 1977b: 206. Subspecies of incompleta: Smith, D.R. 1979: 1349. Junior synonym of alaskensis: Francoeur, 1986b: 57.

Description

Worker Morphology

References

References based on Global Ant Biodiversity Informatics

  • Boucher P., C. Hebert, A. Francoeur, and L. Sirois. 2015. Postfire succession of ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) nesting in dead wood of northern boreal forest. Environ. Entomol. 44(5): 1316-1327: DOI: 10.1093/ee/nvv109
  • Buschinger A., R. D. Schumann, and J. Heinze. 1994. First records of the guest and Formicoxenus quebecensis Francoeur from Western Canada (Hymenoptera, Formicidae. Psyche 101: 53-57.
  • Buschinger, A., R. D. Schumann, and J. Heinze. 1994. First records of the guest ant Formicoxenus quebecensis Francoeur from western Canada (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). Psyche 101:53-57
  • Choate B., and F. A. Drummond. 2012. Ant Diversity and Distribution (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) Throughout Maine Lowbush Blueberry Fields in Hancock and Washington Counties. Environ. Entomol. 41(2): 222-232.
  • Choate B., and F. A. Drummond. 2013. The influence of insecticides and vegetation in structuring Formica Mound ant communities (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in Maine lowbush blueberry. Environ. Entomol. 41(2): 222-232.
  • Downing H., and J. Clark. 2018. Ant biodiversity in the Northern Black Hills, South Dakota (Hymenoptera, Formicidae). Journal of the Kansas Entomological Society 91(2): 119-132.
  • Francoeur A., and M. Bouchard. 2018. Extension du territoire connu de la fourmi Myrmica lampra au Québec (Formicides, Hyménoptères). Le Naturaliste canadien 142(1): 64–65.
  • Francoeur, A. 1983. The ant fauna near the tree-line in Northern Quebec (Formicidae, Hymenoptera). Nordicana 47: 177-180
  • Francoeur, A. 1997. Ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) of the Yukon. Pages 901– 910 in H.V. Danks and J.A. Downes (Eds.), Insects of the Yukon. Biological Survey of Canada (Terrestrial Arthropods), Ottawa.
  • Glasier J. R. N., S. E. Nielsen, J. Acorn, and J. Pinzon. 2019. Boreal sand hills are areas of high diversity for Boreal ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). Diversity 11, 22; doi:10.3390/d11020022.
  • Glasier, J. Alberta Ants. AntWeb.
  • Higgins R. J. 2010. The ant (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) communities of the central interior of British Columbia: adaptations to a temperature-constrained environment. ??? 1-183.
  • Lafleur B., W. F. J. Parsons, R. L. Bradley, and A. Francoeur. 2006. Ground-Nesting Ant Assemblages and Their Relationships to Habitat Factors Along a Chronosequence of Postfire-Regenerated Lichen-Spruce Woodland. Environmental Entomology. 35(6): 151-1524.
  • Lidgren, B.S. and A.M. MacIsaac. 2002. A Preliminary Study of Ant Diversity and of Ant Dependence on Dead Wood in Central Interior British Columbia. USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-181.
  • Lindgren, B.S. and A.M. MacIsaac. 2002. Ant dependence on dead wood in Central Interior British Columbia. USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep.PSW-GTR-181
  • Nielsen M. G. 1987. The ant fauna (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in northern and interior Alaska. A survey along the trans-Alaskan pipeline and a few highways. Entomological News 98:74-88
  • Nielsen, M.G. 1986. Respiratory rates of ants from different climatic areas. Journal of Insect Physiology 32(2): 125-131
  • Nielsen, M.G. 1987. The ant fauna (Hymenoptera:Formicidae) in northern and Interior Alaska. Entomological News 98(2):74-88
  • Varady-Szabo, H. 2004. Spiders and Ants Associated with Fallen Logs in Forillon National Park of Canada, Quebec. Masters Thesis, MgGill University, Montreal, Canada
  • Wheeler, G.C., J. Wheeler and P.B. Kannowski. 1994. CHECKLIST OF THE ANTS OF MICHIGAN (HYMENOPTERA: FORMICIDAE). Great Lakes Entomologist 26:1:297-310