Strumigenys perparva

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Strumigenys perparva
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Class: Insecta
Order: Hymenoptera
Family: Formicidae
Subfamily: Myrmicinae
Tribe: Attini
Genus: Strumigenys
Species: S. perparva
Binomial name
Strumigenys perparva
Brown, 1958

Strumigenys perparva casent0178638 profile 1.jpg

Strumigenys perparva casent0178638 dorsal 1.jpg

Specimen labels

A forest inhabitant.

Identification

Bolton (2000) - This widely distributed minute species is the only member of the group to have posteriorly curved hairs on the upper scrobe margins. In the Neotropical region only perparva and Strumigenys ogloblini have this character, and they were included in a single group by Brown (1958e). However, ogloblini has an intercalary denticle in the apical fork, is larger (HL 0.55-0.56) and has a broad spongiform curtain ventrally on the petiole.

Keys including this Species

Distribution

Distribution based on Regional Taxon Lists

Neotropical Region: Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Panama, Peru, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago (type locality), Venezuela.


Distribution based on AntMaps

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Distribution based on AntWeb specimens

Check data from AntWeb

Biology

Strumigenys were once thought to be rare. The development and increased use of litter sampling methods has led to the discovery of a tremendous diversity of species. Many species are specialized predators (e.g. see Strumigenys membranifera and Strumigenys louisianae). Collembola (springtails) and other tiny soil arthropods are typically favored prey. Species with long linear mandibles employ trap-jaws to sieze their stalked prey (see Dacetine trap-jaws). Larvae feed directly on insect prey brought to them by workers. Trophallaxis is rarely practiced. Most species live in the soil, leaf litter, decaying wood or opportunistically move into inhabitable cavities on or under the soil. Colonies are small, typically less than 100 individuals but in some species many hundreds. Moist warm habitats and micro-habitats are preferred. A few better known tramp and otherwise widely ranging species tolerate drier conditions. Foraging is often in the leaf litter and humus. Workers of many species rarely venture above ground or into exposed, open areas. Individuals are typically small, slow moving and cryptic in coloration. When disturbed individuals freeze and remain motionless. Males are not known for a large majority of species.

Castes

Nomenclature

The following information is derived from Barry Bolton's Online Catalogue of the Ants of the World.

  • perparva. Strumigenys perparva Brown, 1958f: 133, fig. 1 (w.q.) TRINIDAD. [Strumigenys perparva Weber, 1952b: 3; unavailable name, attributed to Brown.] See also: Bolton, 2000: 556.

Unless otherwise noted the text for the remainder of this section is reported from the publication that includes the original description.

Description

Worker

Brown 1958.

TL 1.6-1.8, HL 0.39-0.44, HW 0.32-0.36, CI 81-83, ML 0.20-0.26, MI 50-58, SL 0.20-0.24, SI 62-70, PW 0.20-0.25, AL 0.36-0.44 (10 measured).

Mandible with a single preapical tooth whose length is about equal to, or slightly less than, the distance separating it from the apicodorsal tooth; without a more proximal denticle. With the head in full-face view the spoon-shaped hairs that fringe the upper scrobe margins are curved posteriorly or posterodorsally; this row of hairs terminates in a fine flagellate apicoscrobal hair. Scape with an abrupt subbasal bend; hairs on leading edge of scape that curve toward the base of the scape longer than maximum width of scape. Flagellate hairs present at pronotal humeri, on mesonotum (1 pair), and on waist segments and first gastral tergite. Lamellae on propodeal declivity not dentiform at base. Ventral surface of petiole with a narrow cuticular carina but without spongiform tissue; lateral spongiform lobe of petiole vestigial, nothing more than a slight extension of the posterior collar.

Queen

Brown (195) - Dealate: TL 1.7, HL 0.40, ML 0.20, WL 0.42 mm.; CI 86, MI 51.

Differs from worker in the usual ways. Petiolar node even more depressed, and wider. Mesonotum evenly and densely punctulate, with carina or rugulae; with a few short, fine erect hairs. Eyes very small for a female Strumigenys, only weakly convex.

Type Material

Holotype worker, paratype worker and queen, TRINIDAD: Pitch Lake, 22.vi.1935 (N. A. Weber); paratypes, BRAZIL: Sao Paulo, Agudos, 6.iii.1955, No. 1376 (C. Gilbert); Belem do Pant (C.R. Goncalves) (American Museum of Natural History, Museum of Comparative Zoology, National Museum of Natural History, Museu de Zoologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, The Natural History Museum) [examined].

References

References based on Global Ant Biodiversity Informatics

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