Dixey, Frederick Augustus (1855-1935)

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BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE

FREDERICK AUGUSTUS DIXEY commenced his scientific career as a medical man and took the degree of B.M., B.Ch., Oxon, in 1884, followed by the D.M. in 1891. He was for a while demonstrator in physiology at University College, London, and also at Oxford from 1883; and a histological preparation made by him was used for an illustration still reproduced in Quain's "Anatomy". But it was as an entomologist that Dixey will be remembered: his first entomological publication was on the phylo-genetic significance of wing markings in certain Nymphalid butterflies, and until his death on January 16, in his eightieth year, he was associated with the study of evolutionary entomology at Oxford, so intimately bound up with the name of Poulton.

He felt drawn to the church of St. Barnabas, Oxford, famous for its Anglo-Catholic tradition and ceremonies, he sang in the choir for nearly forty years. He was knocked down and killed by a bus in 1935 as he attempted to cross the road. It was due to his inability to judge distances accurately.


PUBLICATIONS

AUTHORS: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z